Derek Chauvin trial — live: Defence claims George Floyd told police ‘I ate too many drugs’

Watch live as murder trial of former Minneapolis officer Derek Chauvin continues

The murder trial of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin enters its eighth day on Wednesday morning, following another day of witness testimony on Tuesday.

Several senior members of the Minneapolis police force have testified against Mr Chauvin this week in a damning indictment of the former officer’s actions, with police chief Medaria Arradondo telling the court on Monday that officer Chauvin should not have put his knee into George Floyd’s neck.

On Tuesday, Jody Stiger, a use of force expert from the Los Angeles Police Department, agreed, stating in testimony: “My opinion was that the force was excessive.”

Mr Stiger noted that officers initially had grounds to use force on Mr Floyd, since he was “actively resisting” arrest and flailing as officers tried to get him into a squad car.

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“Initially when Mr Floyd was being put in the backseat of the vehicle, he was actively resisting the officers,” Mr Stiger testified.

“However, once he was placed in the prone position on the ground, he slowly ceased his resistance and at that point the ex-officers, they should have slowed down or stopped their force as well,” he added.

The jury is set to reconvene at 9:15am CT (3:15 UK) on Wednesday, as Mr Stiger returns to the witness stand for further questioning.

Check out The Independent’s live updates and analysis below.

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New witness to testify: McKenzie Anderson, Minnesota forensic scientist

Next up on the stand is McKenzie Anderson, a forensic scientist from the Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension, the state police agency which investigated George Floyd’s fatal arrest.

Josh Marcus7 April 2021 21:02

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Minnesota state investigator says Mr Floyd insisted he wasn’t on drugs

After initially being dismissed, James Reyerson, a special agent with the Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension who investigated Mr Floyd’s death, was called back into court to clarify what he could and couldn’t hear Mr Floyd saying about drug use on police body camera video.

At first, he said he hadn’t previously reviewed the specific clip where the defence claims Mr Floyd said “I ate too many drugs,” and couldn’t make out Mr Floyd’s remarks.

Upon listening to it for a second time in court on Wednesday, Mr Reyerson agreed that it did sound like Mr Floyd was talking about ingesting drugs.

Finally, upon being called back and hearing the clip for a third time, this time in an extended clip to put Mr Floyd’s words in their full context, he concluded Mr Floyd didn’t say he had taken drugs, but rather the opposite.

“I believe Mr Floyd was saying, ‘I ain’t do no drugs,’” he said.

Josh Marcus7 April 2021 20:57

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Defence claims George Floyd told police ‘I ate too many drugs’

George Floyd allegedly told officers “I ate too many drugs” while he was being handcuffed during his fatal arrest, according to a brief, chaotic video clip defence attorneys played in court on Wednesday during the Derek Chauvin murder trial. Witnesses who reviewed the footage before and during the trial of Mr Chauvin, accused of murdering Mr Floyd as he kneeled on his neck for more than nine minutes during a May arrest, were split on whether Mr Floyd actually said that.

James Reyerson, a special agent with the Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension who investigated Mr Floyd’s death, at first said he hadn’t heard that specific clip and couldn’t make out Mr Floyd’s remarks. Upon listening to it for a second time in court on Wednesday, Mr Reyerson agreed that it did sound like Mr Floyd was talking about ingesting drugs.

Previously, Jody Stiger, a use of force expert with the Los Angeles Police Department called as an expert witness to review the case, told the court he couldn’t hear what Mr Floyd was saying in the clip.

Former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin’s lawyers have blamed George Floyd’s death in part on a drug overdose.

I’ve got the details here.

Josh Marcus7 April 2021 20:30

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The George Floyd investigation, by the numbers

Some interesting data points about the George Floyd case we’ve heard in court today:

– According to official timestamps, police continued to kneel on George Floyd for at least two minutes after he stopped moving

– Investigators executed a dozen search warrants as they reviewed the incident

– Derek Chauvin, between his body and his police gear, was putting about 180 pounds of weight onto George Floyd’s neck and back

– Roughly 200 citizen witnesses were interviewed

Josh Marcus7 April 2021 19:59

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Trial returns to body camera videos

One of the most fiercely contested questions in this case is where exactly was Derek Chauvin’s knee: on George Floyd’s neck, as the state and bystander video suggests, or his upper back, as the defence claims?

That could prove the difference between answering whether Mr Chauvin used deadly or non-deadly force, and followed Minneapolis police training.

According to James Reyerson, an officer from Minnesota’s Bureau of Criminal Apprehension who was part of the team of investigators who reviewed the arrest as a “critical incident,” one of Mr Chauvin’s knees was on the back of Mr Floyd’s neck.

Josh Marcus7 April 2021 19:48

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Trial begins probing medical evidence around George Floyd’s death

So far, the trial has focused mostly on police training and the scene of George Floyd’s fatal arrest.

Now James Reyerson, an officer from Minnesota’s Bureau of Criminal Apprehension who was part of the team of investigators who reviewed the arrest as a “critical incident,” is giving us more information about Mr Floyd’s blood samples and autopsy.

Josh Marcus7 April 2021 19:34

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Derek Chauvin trial resumes

Court is back in session with the continued testimony of James Reyerson, an officer from Minnesota’s Bureau of Criminal Apprehension, who was part of the team of investigators who reviewed the George Floyd arrest as a “critical incident.”

Josh Marcus7 April 2021 19:20

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Trial breaks for lunch

We’re going to have to wait to hear more from James Reyerson, an officer from Minnesota’s Bureau of Criminal Apprehension, until the court gets back from its lunch break.

Mr Reyerson was part of the team of investigators who reviewed the George Floyd arrest as a “critical incident.”

Josh Marcus7 April 2021 18:27

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Two major arguments have emerged so far today

Two big claims have emerged today in court, both totally different from the other.

Derek Chauvin’s lawyers have argued his knee wasn’t actually on George Floyd’s neck, while Jody Stiger, a use of force expert testifying for the state, says officers should’ve done more to provide medical care to Mr Floyd.

I’ve got more details here.

Josh Marcus7 April 2021 18:24

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Now on the stand: James Reyerson

Next up is James Reyerson, an officer from Minnesota’s Bureau of Criminal Apprehension.

Josh Marcus7 April 2021 18:09

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